Without an H

Photography from south-east Asia by Jon Sanwell

Posts tagged ‘details’

Yangon & on

171208-076-edited

I’ve had this post – and a couple of others – on the backburner for a while. I haven’t posted them because, while I’m fairly happy with the pictures, I’ve been stuck for something to write to accompany them. And I still am. But I don’t want this blog to completely fade away, so I’ve decided to stop trying to write something insightful about Yangon, and just throw this post out there and hope that the photographs speak for themselves. So here are some more pictures of Yangon. I hope you like them.

171208-109-edited

yangon-details

180107-093-edited

180125-082-edited

171028-119-edited

170928-165-edited

170922-124-edited

woodwork-collage

171208-037-edited

171110-052-edited

180125-106-edited171231-188-edited

171225-012-edited

yangon-details-2

171225-232-edited

171028-075-edited

170929-090-edited

180203-259-edited

180203-301-edited

180203-053-edited

Advertisements

Pazundaung Zay (II)

170921-164-edited

A few more pictures from Yangon’s Pazundaung market.

170921-230-edited

170921-255-edited

170921-275-edited

170921-228-edited

170923-027-edited

170923-051-edited

170923-122-edited

170923-154-edited

170923-167-edited

170923-193-edited

170923-229-edited

170923-252-edited

171103-043-edited

171103-175-edited

171103-231-edited

Pazundaung Zay (I)

171103-052-edited

Pazundaung market has become one of my favourite locations for photography in Yangon over the last few months. It’s mainly known for its fresh fish, meat, fruit and vegetables, but you can also find clothing, household goods, spices and, due to its riverside location, rope and fishing nets.

171103-003-edited

171103-012-edited

171103-046-edited

170923-425-edited

170921-213-edited

170921-244-edited

pazundaung-details

171103-160-edited

170923-332-edited

171103-137-edited

170921-171-edited

170921-202-edited

170923-054-edited

170923-208-edited

171103-278-edited

Lugubrious gentleman (and other pictures)

171028-061-edited

Yangonites are a fairly cheerful bunch as a rule; this rather solemn looking gent is one of the exceptions.

171124-010-edited

Chewing betel leaf is still a very common habit in Myanmar; these pavement stalls can be found on almost every street corner.

170929-017-edited

170928-181-edited

171014-056-edited

Note to self: eat more bananas.

170928-023-edited

Know your onions.

170929-136-edited

Individually wrapped apples; only in south-east Asia?

171007-177-edited

Good vibes; a Buddhist band prepares to take to the streets.

171006-075-edited

171007-035-edited

170926-064-edited

170926-071-edited

171028-155-edited

Something magical about the early afternoon light in Yangon, even if it’s just falling on an apartment block.

171028-103-edited

171014-023-edited

Sule pagoda; this leafy view is a little misleading as the pagoda is always surrounded by traffic, due to its location in the middle of a downtown roundabout.

170929-082-edited

171028-149-edited

Urban Ha Giang

170429-343-edited

Most of the pictures we see from Vietnam’s Ha Giang province focus on rural life: landscapes, markets, villages, people from ethnic minorities in traditional costume. Nothing wrong with that, of course; I’ve taken plenty of those pictures myself, and posted them here.

But what about the urban life of the province? Dong Van, Meo Vac, Yen Minh and Ha Giang City may not be the most vibrant locations – nobody goes there for the nightlife – but there’s plenty of interest in the everyday life of these unassuming, low key towns. Travelling through the province in the autumn of last year and the spring of this, I became fascinated by urban Ha Giang: the banh cuon joints, the cafes and tea stands, the meat and vegetable markets, the games of checkers and volleyball, the windows and doorways, all the little things that make up the lives of these highland towns.

I think these towns are more than just places to spend the night before speeding off on the next leg of the loop. They are surrounded by mountains and karsts but, overlooked by breathtaking scenery, daily life goes on as normal. I suppose even the most beautiful surroundings can become mundane if you see them every day.

Of course, you can’t completely ignore the rural element in this part of the country, even in the towns. There’s no dividing line; the rural and the urban blend into each other. Walking down the streets of Dong Van or Yen Minh, you can catch glimpses of the surrounding countryside through gaps between the buildings where houses are being knocked down or built up. Dong Van is a town surrounded by mountains and sheltering a basin of rice fields. People from Vietnam’s numerous ethnic minorities are in the majority here.

These pictures were all taken in Dong Van, Meo Vac, Yen Minh and Ha Giang in April and May of this year.

170429-379-edited

170501-265-edited

170429-331-edited

170429-094-edited

170429-062-edited

170503-392-edited-2

170501-212-edited

170503-441-edited

170501-380-edited

170429-392-edited

170429-305-edited

doors-windows-2

170429-006-edited

170501-483-edited

170503-465-edited

170503-497-edited

170503-526-edited

170501-438-edited

Odds & ends | Pasar Beringharjo (IV)

170602-063-edited

This is the final set of pictures from my trip to Indonesia earlier this year. The trip actually ended about four months ago, but it’s taken me a long time to sort through, process and publish the pictures. In my defence, I’ve had other things to think about, like packing up my life and moving to a new country. The month-long trip began in the megacity of Jakarta, on the island of Java, after which I went on to the much more laid-back cities of Jogja and Solo, taking in the temples of Borobudur and Prambanan along the way, before heading on to Bromo and Ijen in the volcanic east. Finally, I spent a relaxing week in and around Ubud, on the island of Bali. Despite all this travelling, there’s so much of Indonesia that I didn’t see; I would have liked to have visited the Gili Islands and Borneo, but even with a month to spend, there just wan’t enough time. But I don’t really have any regrets about not getting everywhere. I tend to travel quite slowly. My thinking is always that I’d rather spend more time in fewer places than travel through lots of places in a rush. Even with my relatively limited itinerary of just Java and Bali, I experienced a huge variety of sights, landscapes, cultures, food, architecture and sensations.

Although I visited Jogja near the beginning of the trip, I saved these pictures until last, as it was one of my favourite places. While the volcanoes of Bromo and Ijen were quite challenging locations for me as a photographer, Jogja offered me plenty of chances to do what I like best, photograph people in their everyday lives, on the streets and in the markets. It’s good to step outside of your comfort zone sometimes, and I’m certainly glad to have visited those volcanic areas in east Java, but there’s also something to be said for sticking to what you’re good at (and hopefully getting better at it). So here are a dozen more pictures from Pasar Beringharjo, Jogja’s central market.

170528-042-edited

170528-124-edited

170528-191-edited

170528-215-edited

170528-221-edited

170602-073-edited

170602-081-edited

170602-087-edited

170602-172-edited

170602-176-edited

170602-314-edited

**********

You are cordially invited to join me on Instagram.

**********

Nuts & things | Pasar Beringharjo (III)

170528-143-edited

My trip to Indonesia included visits to live volcanoes and ancient temples, but I think I took more pictures in this market in Jogja than anywhere else. In this series, you will find fruit, nuts, chillies and curious-looking sweets (at least I think they’re sweets in the last few pictures; someone please correct me if I’m wrong).

[On another note, I’ve now been living in Yangon for just over three weeks. It’s been a busy time, what with starting work, finding a place to live and generally getting my bearings. I’ll no doubt write a lot more about Yangon at a later date, but for now, I’ll just say that life here here is shaping up nicely, and the whole settling in process has gone remarkably smoothly. I’ve been taking a lot of pictures too, in between teaching and apartment-hunting, but I’m not going to post any here just yet, as I still have a bit of a backlog to clear from earlier in the year; these Indonesia pictures were taken back in May and June. I’m not even allowing myself to look at the pictures I’ve taken in Yangon yet; they’re hidden away in a dark corner of my hard drive, away from my Lightroom library. But if you’re interested in a visual comparison of Yangon and Hanoi, the homepage of this site is currently showing a slideshow of pictures from the two cities. These are the photographs that were included in the Hanoi/Yangon exhibition I had this time last year (Hanoi is in black and white, Yangon in colour).]

170528-155-edited

170528-068-edited

170528-079-edited

170528-111-edited

170602-209-edited

jogja-market-1

170602-192-edited

170528-349-edited

jogja-market-2

170528-304-edited

170528-296-edited

170528-281-edited

Fabric | Pasar Beringharjo (II)

170602-116-edited

Pasar Beringharjo – in Jogja, Java – is one of those big, sprawling south-east Asian urban markets that seem to sell almost everything. This post focuses on the ladies – and occasional rogue gentleman – selling fabric, dresses, shirts, bags and headscarves.

170528-009-edited

170602-097-edited-2

170602-109-edited

170602-122-edited-2

170602-138-edited

170602-148-edited

170528-019-edited

170528-259-edited

170602-136-edited

170602-157-edited

170602-159-edited

170602-105-edited

170602-139-edited

170602-114-edited

Onions & garlic | Pasar Beringharjo

170602-251-edited

There’s something about markets in south-east Asia. I just love taking photographs in them. Pasar Beringharjo, the central market in Jogja, on the island of Java, is now one of my favourites. There’s a lot more available there than just onions and garlic, but the clothes and fruit and veg and nuts and bolts and bits and bobs will just have to wait for later posts.

170602-216-edited

170602-217-edited

170602-264-edited

170602-279-edited

170602-293-edited

170602-295-edited

170602-283-edited

170602-308-edited