Without an H

Photography from south-east Asia by Jon Sanwell

A song of ice and fish

180222-182-edited

This time last year, I made a couple of visits to Nyaung Tan jetty, a small but thriving fishing port on Pazundaung Creek, near where I live in Yangon. Huge amounts of fish pass through here every day. Work seems to be divided along gender lines – women sort fish into coloured plastic baskets, while men feed huge blocks of ice into crushing machines.

* * * * *

I’d like to say a big thank you to everyone who responded to my last post. Your support means a lot to me. I hope to be posting more regularly again from now on, and may even have some more recent pictures to share before too long.

180303-269-edited

180303-294-edited

180222-210-edited

180303-192-edited

180303-210-edited

jetty-composite

180222-214-edited

180303-112-edited

180303-218-edited

180303-144-edited

180303-226-edited

180303-161-edited

180303-252-edited

180303-177-edited

180303-247-edited

180303-308-edited

Advertisements

12 Responses to “A song of ice and fish”

  1. NocturnalTwins

    Your pictures are always fascinating and I tend to linger a bit longer on them than others. It’s like a good story, it just hooks you in.

    Reply
    • Jon Sanwell

      Thank you, that’s good to hear. That story-telling aspect is something I’m always trying to improve on in my pictures.

      Reply
  2. Alison and Don

    Wonderful photos – you captured the feel of the place. I can’t imagine what it would be like to do that work. We are so lucky.
    Alison

    Reply
  3. bluebrightly

    Interesting! I’ve certainly never seen anything like this. In the second to last photo, is that the crushed ice coming out of the tube and going into some kind of a hold, where the fish are kept before being sorted? I love the photo just above that one – with the very pretty woman surrounded by all the baskets. And the angle of the one above that, is great. Thanks for posting!

    Reply
    • Jon Sanwell

      Yes, it’s a really interesting place to visit. And yes, that’s the crushed ice going into the hold of a ship, I think so that they can keep the next catch fresh.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: